Our money saving expert (and mom of four) shares how to get your kids saving

By: Julie Standlee, Deposit Operations Officer, Assistant Vice President, Arizona, First International Bank & Trust

It’s a question we hear so often in all our locations: How to get kids saving money now? As a deposits officer and a parent, here are some guidelines that have helped our customers—and our own family of four kids, two boys and two girls, ages 2 – 10, including one who would prefer to spend every nickel, and one who would proudly save every penny.

Start early
Growing up, my mom was a bank teller, and she took care of the billing for my dad’s business. He’d started a small business after he served in the military. From a very young age, my mom took my sister and me along for weekly trips to the bank. My parents also helped us set up our own savings accounts.

We encourage parents to bring their kids in to the bank. Meet with a banker to open their accounts. Teach them how to fill out deposit slips. (You would be amazed at the young adults we see who have no idea how to do this!)

Standlee Kids

Julie and her husband have four kids, who they are helping learn to save money.

Get in the Kid’s Club
Open a savings account for each of your children, such as what we call a Kid’s Club Account. It has no minimum balance, no fees and the individual can keep it open until they reach age 24. That’s a great time for us to meet with young adults, too, since they’ve likely started a career and all that includes—and they are getting lots of credit card applications in the mail. We like to guide them through this new level of financial responsibilities and opportunities.

Rewards now—and later
Teach kids to save by saving. I know that sounds simple, but it also is simple. For example, when our kids get money (birthday gifts, allowance, money for chores), they deposit 75 percent into their savings accounts; they keep 25 percent.

Cash in
Kids are literal. We encourage parents to bring checks and other money in to the bank. Fill out a deposit slip, have the teller cash out the entire amount and have the kids count out the actual bills to deposit some and pocket some. This gets them accustomed to interacting with bankers—and real cash. We don’t use ATMs or online systems; once they know the basic principles, they will understand what is happening via technology as they use those tools to manage their finances later in life.

Growing up green
As kids’ financial needs change, keep them involved in the decisions. We don’t recommend debit cards until age 16. If kids do need a larger amount of money, such as for a school trip, we recommend gift cards like our Visa gift cards. They are re-loadable, and safer than carrying cash or good old traveler’s checks.

Beyond savings
Besides these guidelines, we encourage parents to involve kids in other family financial matters, as age appropriate. For instance, when they need to do a fundraiser for school, sports or activities, have them help keep track of the details. Show them the costs involved in participating in sports and activities so they understand the value of money.

Above all, teach kids to enjoy the rewards of money now—and the rewards of saving. Enjoy the moment, yet plan and look ahead, too. That seems like a good parenting principle for other issues, as well!

All our bankers are well-versed in Kid’s Club Accounts and other options for youngsters—and we love seeing your kids in the bank. Bring them in for a visit, a treat and a lesson on filling out a deposit slip!.

Julie StandleeJulie grew up in Burbank, Calif., and started her career at Warner Brothers there. Julie relocated to Arizona 15 years ago, and after time at a few other companies, she wanted to get back to working for a community bank and joined First International Bank & Trust, where she has now been for more than six years. Julie and her husband, who also works in financial services, cheer on their four kids in various sports and activities, while teaching them how to save money.

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